Professional chamber ensembles

For all these reasons, we’re super happy to be able to experience musical life in Africa through the work of a handful of amazing nonprofit organizations, learning communities, and platforms for creative expression, and we believe that the future of global popular music is already being shaped on the African continent as we speak. Here are six initiatives in Africa today doing constructive work for the future of music and music education.

Making any sort of impact through music requires an insane amount of work, as well as dedication, commitment, and inward-looking. From learning an instrument and writing songs to recording albums, booking shows, and embarking on tours, nothing good in music ever happens without a work ethic. Sure, there are times when inspiration for a song appears out of nowhere without effort or planning, but most momentum in music is generated by tedious non-musical work: writing emails, sticking to a regular rehearsal schedule, setting time aside each day to write music and play your instrument.

I don’t know what it is about this West Virginia University hub, but I have found time and time again that even bands without a huge national following can attract a packed, excited crowd in Morgantown. People just can’t get enough music here, and they’re welcoming enough to give you a shot and come to your show even if they’ve never heard your music. Plus, with West Virginia’s proximity to Pittsburgh, Washington, DC, Baltimore, and Columbus (not to mention all the other secret hot spots in Ohio), it’s an easy detour that will surely be worth the trip.

Emergency financial assistance for musicians

The problem is that these tendencies are the exact opposite of what we should be doing if we want to see real improvement, according to Dr. Anders Ericsson. And we might be wise to listen. Dr. Ericsson is widely considered one of the foremost thinkers on the subject of “expertise.” His research is one of the primary sources that inspired Malcolm Gladwell’s now-famous “10,000 Hour Rule” — that it takes 10,000 hours of deliberate practice to be an expert in anything. But that rule, though memorable, is far from the whole story.

Jeremy is a Montreal-based musician, sound artist and improviser who loves giving advice to emerging artists on how to make their tours more effective. He writes, records and performs electroacoustic “concrète” music for tape, oscillators and amplified objects and surfaces, as well as solo guitar. He has performed and released material throughout Europe and the UK, Asia, the US and Canada, mostly with his trio Sontag Shogun.

Roland developed the RE-201 in the early 1970s, and while this wasn’t the first tape echo, they made something much more durable and sonically satisfying than anything that had come before it. Starting in the 1950s, musicians started to use small devices that included a recorder and a single tape loop capable of simultaneously recording and playing sound. This would create a delay effect.

Sırma loves working with students at the intersection of songwriting and production, helping them figure out how to produce the sounds they hear in their heads using the software at their fingertips. In particular, she specializes in vocal production.

In this landmark case, Judge Kevin Thomas Duffy ruled that Warner Brothers had to stop all distribution of Biz Markie’s song and album, and that Markie owed O’Sullivan $250,000 in damages. Judge Duffy began his opinion with the biblical admonition, “Thou shalt not steal,” and referred the case to criminal court on the grounds of theft (Markie was not charged this time).

International music charities

All of our mentored online courses come with six weeks of 1-on-1 professional coaching and feedback on your work. It’s like having a personal trainer, but for music! Dive deep into production-related topics like Modern and Advanced Mix Techniques, Songwriting for Producers, or Making Music in Logic Pro X, or work with a Soundfly Mentor directly to achieve a musical goal specific to you!

The Who’s penchant for rule-breaking, as seen in this performance, no doubt influenced the ethics of all the proto-punk acts that came after them. If anti-establishment antics become the norm, push it a step farther and never stop. Well done, Keith.

Explore our wide array of free online courses to expand your musical skills and gain a competitive edge on your lunch break! With free online courses such as Alternate Tunings for the Creative Guitarist, Touring on a Shoestring, How to Get All the Royalties You Never Knew Existed, and Digital Pedalboards with Kaki King, here’s what you can expect to see on Soundfly. 

“[Bariolage] is a common technique to build tension near the end of a long violin piece and there are numerous possible inspirations for this particular passage in earlier chaconnes. In the Bach Chaconne, however, given that right mood and right performer, it matters not at all if one knows what a bariolage is or where it came from. What matters is that it sounds like a kind of outcry — not the sad little two-note sighs we have been taught to listen for in Mozart or Chopin, but long, hoarse-throated, mascara-streaked, Jessye Norman — collapsing-in-a-heap groans. Once you’ve felt this passage that way once, it is hard not to feel it that way every time you hear the Chaconne, and even to demand it, judging performers on the Daniel Day-Lewis scale of how many forehead veins they sound like they’re about to pop.”

Need help on a project, or buying a new piece of gear, or even deciphering your favorite band’s lyrics? Forums are where people go to help one another.